Your Guide to Organic, Biodynamic and Natural Wine



Grgich Hills Earthquake

Michael Eckstein, Associate Winemaker at Grgich Hills with damaged barrels of Zinfandel.

Our best wishes go out to all people, and all wineries, affected by the earthquake in Napa. Here is a roundup of what we’ve learned about some of our organic winemakers.

Frog’s Leap

On Twitter, Frog’s Leap posted:

Thankfully, we had minor damage & will reopen Monday. RT @TIME: The largest earthquake to hit Napa Valley in 25 years http://ti.me/1mDNfUW

Robert Sinskey

On Twitter, Robert Sinskey posted:

Robert Sinskey Vineyards made it through the earthquake largely unscathed! We are OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Come visit us!

Grgich Hills

On Facebook, Grgich Hills posted:

Thank you to everyone for your phone calls, emails and texts! We are all safe and sound, with minimal earthquake damage to a few barrels. Come on by our Tasting Room – we are opening up now for tasting only, no tours or stomping just to be on the safe side.

Domaine Carneros

The Los Angeles Times spoke with T.J. Evans at Domaine Carneros:

T.J. Evans, winemaker at Domaine Carneros in Napa, said a 3,000- and 6,000-gallon tank filled with sparking wine showed signs of minor damage after swaying from their concrete moorings.

Power was out briefly, leaving no way for coolant to calm the hot fermentation of the wine. The winery’s barrels, however, were undisturbed.

“We’re extraordinarily lucky,” Evans said. “We have a little survivor’s guilt.”

Tres Sabores

Tres Sabores on Twitter:

#napaearthquake an experience to be virtually launched out of bed. TS ppl safe tgdns but not good for rest/retail friends + wishes friends


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Punch writer Aaron Ayscough reports that demand for limited Natural Wines in Paris has led some restaurants to try and keep them hidden from customers not deemed worthy:

The simplest defense against cherry pickers, practiced at wine-shop-slash-restaurant Le Verre Volé and celebrated Belleville bistrot Le Baratin, is to have no wine list at all. Ostensibly this is to ensure that each table arrives at the optimum wine choice. In practice, it also ensures that clients are screened before each wine sale.

Meanwhile, at the Left Bank’s historic Café de la Nouvelle Mairie there is a generous list of natural wines—but it’s only shown on demand. In my experience, staff members I don’t know typically point me to the blackboard of glass-pour wines when I request the list. Each time I must insist that there is indeed a wine list—often making a silly rectangular motion in the air with my fingers—before the server concedes and hands it over.

Read the full article at punchdrink.com.


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Edible Manhattan

Organic Wine Journal just got written up in Edible Manhattan by writer Alia Akkam. Check out the article here.

“We don’t want people to drink a biodynamic wine just because it’s biodynamic. It should be judged on its own merit, like with conventional wines. But if two products are equally good, why would you not take the organic one, where the winemaker lets nature do the work?”


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A new organic and biodynamic wine bar is opening in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. From DNAinfo:

Sunrise/Sunset, 351 Evergreen Ave., opened last Thursday with just bar hours, starting at 5 p.m., said owner Henry Glucroft, 29, who also owns Henry’s Wine and Spirit at 69 Central Ave.

Glucroft, a self-professed wine aficionado, wants to expand the wine list to include more than 100 bottles of natural, organic, biodynamic wine by next week, he said.

The bar currently serves 10 wines by the glass and offers three champagnes. Glucroft, who spent much of his childhood outside Paris, gravitates towards natural, biodynamic wines because they’re made from grapes in self-contained farms that don’t use any pesticides and don’t add chemicals.


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The makers of the documentary Wine The Green Revolution have put some smaller videos online to explain organic and biodynamic winemaking techniques.

Here is one where Pierre Masson explains Lunar and Astral Rhythms.


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New wine bar in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, focussing on organic and Biodynamic wines.

Sort of Wine Bar
639 Driggs Ave
Sort of Wine Bar Facebook Page

Read more about them on Greenpoint Gazette.


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From Wired:

You’d think the various adjuncts wouldn’t make it past the sommeliers, high-end buyers, and big-name critics of the wine world, that such chemical or mechanical shortcuts would be picked up by their well-trained palates. But the truth is that these things can’t be sniffed, tasted, or spotted unless they are overused.

“Usually you need lab equipment to detect additives,” Draper says. “The Europeans had a very sophisticated machine that could analyze a sample for non-approved varieties like the Rubired in Mega Purple [a popular grape concentrate used to deepen the color of red wine], which was used to reject non-vinifera wines being imported from the States. They also had another machine that could detect whether non-grape sugar was added to a wine, and could even tell where the beets used for the sugar came from.”

Draper’s solution is not banning adjuncts, but asking winemakers to disclose them on a voluntary basis.


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Here is a short film on Cecchin Winery in Mendoza, Argentina, filmed by Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine of The Perennial Plate.

A Very Old Concept from The Perennial Plate on Vimeo.


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